The New Progress Gay Flag

new progress pride flag

 

                new progress pride flag

Gilbert Baker’s gay flag has been an internationally recognized symbol of the LGBTQ community since it first flew in San Francisco’s United Nations Plaza for Gay Pride Day, on June 25, 1978. However, more recently we have The New Progress Gay Flag design emerging. Gilbert died on March 31, 2017. 

Gilbert’s original design had 8 stripes.  Indigo (Serenity) and turquoise (Magic/Art) were changed to royal blue (Peace/harmony) around 1979 and hot pink (sex) was eventually also dropped to make mass production easier. These 6 remaining color stripes represent life (red), healing (orange), sunlight (yellow), nature (green), harmony/peace (blue), and spirit (purple/violet).

gay flag 6 stripes

Monica Helms designed our current transgender flag in 1999, consists of one horizontal white stripe, surrounded by two horizontal pink stripes and two light blue stripes. 

This new design was created by a graphic designer Daniel Quasar in 2018. It is a combination of original gay and transgender elements. This new main background includes our traditional 6 stripe LGBTQ flag and incorporated some transgender flag elements. The trans flag and marginalized community stripes were shifted to the Hoist and given a new arrow shape and added to original stripes. These arrows point to the right to show forward movement, while being along the left edge shows that progress still needs to be made. Hoist colors are 5 half sized stripes representing trans individuals (light blue, light pink, white), marginalized POC communities (brown, black), as well as those living with AIDS, those no longer living, and stigma surrounding them (black). 

There is some aversion to changing the gay flag. Many people state gender and race are different from sexuality. What do you think about its design?  Is it time for a new gay flag design?  What do you think the original creator Gilbert would have thought of this new design? 

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